Posts Tagged ‘vintage’

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February 14, 2012

L’Eroica! L’Eroica! L’Eroica!

October 25, 2011

Damn, for a minute there it had slipped my mind but this edit just reminded me of how much of an awesome time I had at this year’s L’Eroica… Look at my face at the top of the first climb, Never after slogging my guts out have I looked so happy! Must be the wine.

Thank you Le Coq Sportif! And while on the subject I must give shouts out to Mike, Marc and Billy for without them it would not have happened.x

L’Eroica 2011 and a Canonet 28.

October 9, 2011

First, let me explain:

I bought a camera, a Canonet 28 rangefinder 12 months ago from a market in Oswestry and instantly I fell in love with it’s small size and ease of use. That week I ran a film through it and the results were O.K but something was very wrong, I had horrible vertical lines and what looked like half frames over 90% of my negatives and consequently my prints too:

I only paid £3 for it but I was still quite unhappy as I knew what this little beast of a camera was capable of, unfortunately for me those capabilities did not translate through to my pictures.

I thought maybe it was the film, so I tried another. The same results. I thought perhaps it was the lab I was using, so I tried another and yet again, the same results.

At this point I’m gutted and beginning to type ‘canonet’ into Ebay every week to try and find a replacement. There were a few of them listed, but none of them £3. I’m about ready to quit.

I grab my DSLR again and begin using that, but in my opinion nothing can compare to the look and feel of film and also being able to fix a moment in time onto something physical is something that pleases me so once again I grab the Canonet and I proceed to open the back of it. I figure either the shutter is sticking or the rollers have filth in them so I use a small brush and some compressed air and I probe and hope that I can somehow accidentally fix the problem.

It’s 11 months now since I got my mitts on this camera and it’s still acting up but I had just messed with it so I cross my fingers and hope that this time my prints will be crystal clear and free from all unwanted lines and blemishes. I run a test film and low and behold, the results are exactly the same! I still have lines and I still have strange shadows and what look like half frames. A ghost in the camera maybe? I doubt it.

I’m now ready to take this heap of junk and toss it into a fire but I was desperate to take it with me to L’Eroica. The problem is it doesn’t work properly and time is running out for me to find a replacement.

I decide to finally take it to two camera stores with a selection of the dodgy prints to see if they can shed any light on my problem. I got nothing but the web address for a man who could “look at it” for me.

Three days now until L’Eroica and it’s not looking good so I have one last blast at fixing this piece of crap and then, after what seemed like hours of me staring into that back of the camera with a torch and a magnifying glass, like an apple falling onto the head it came to me *rolls drum* all along I’v been shooting rolls of film through this thing and it has no light seals, not anywhere, none!

A quick trip to my local haberdashery and I return with black felt and double sided tape for the DIY repair job. An hour later and I think I’ve solved my problem and just in the nick of time as in two days I fly to Italy for Le Coq Sportif’s L’Eroica. I have just enough time to shoot a roll and have it developed to see the results. These next prints will dictate whether this beauty of a rangefinder ends up either in the fire and burned to death or strapped proudly around my neck in Chianti.

It worked! I win! It’s now fixed and I can’t even begin to tell you how happy I am, it’s such an amazing little thing, it really is and all for £3 too. If you are ever after a compact, robust rangefinder and you can’t afford a Leica, go for one of these, seriously, they are that good.

And now some shots from my trip to L’Eroica last week with Le Coq Sportif. All of the following photographs were taken using my repaired Canonet 28;

See the rest of the Canonet group here.
Peep the Le Coq Sportif L’Eroica photopool here.
For more of my black and white photo work peep my Tumblr.

L’Eroica 2011. The Flea market [photographs].

October 4, 2011

Day one on Saturday sees the flea market come into town, I say flea market it is a great big cycle jumble in English terms. Stretched out either side of Gaiole’s main road this jumble is big and not only is it big, it is good, very good. Everything you ever needed for your period build and all the accompaniments to go with it can be found here. Even the rarest of the rare is on the tables, it seems that the cream of Italy’s cycle merchandise dealers have landed in Chianti for the day to bless all of the hungry with their wares. You simply do not get a selection this good in the U.K.

I could have bought it all, I really could. Had I gone there with an empty suitcase and a full bank account I surely would have at least grabbed a frame or two, and some wheels, and a groupset and then probably most of the other needed components to build a complete. Instead I bought a Gios T-shirt, I figured I should buy something off them considering how much I was lurking around their stall all day, staring at those beautiful blue frames.

Peep more photographs over at my Flickrspot.

L’Eroica 2011. It’s coming.

September 11, 2011

Just under three weeks wait until this years L’eroica and once again I’ll be travelling out there to Italy with Le Coq Sportif to document the weekend’s activities.

If you don’t yet know about this fantastic annual event then it’s about time you did. Last year’s L’Eroica -my first- was an absolute eye opener for me and you can read all about it here.

Mora at L’Eroica Ciclismo.

Mercier Hotness. 1980.

May 31, 2011

MERCIER FORMULE 1
France, 1980

Road bike with full aero styled Super Vitus 971 framework #M67666 finished in Mercier’s malve metallic. Shimano 600 EX group (6200), Belleri bar/stem, Ambrosio Montreal blue finished tubular rims, S.Marco Concor Supercorsa saddle and Wolber tubulars.

Beautiful bike. Great to see Shimano getting some love… And 600, too. A boss group.

Seen.

Giro 1973.

May 9, 2011

Some resting and a Major Nichols.

May 3, 2011

Seen.

Flickr grips.

April 18, 2011

Still hooked on scans!
Via Windy’s amazing photoset.

Ronson TT Hardness.

April 4, 2011

This is Brigand Doom’s latest acquisition and it’s a mighty fine one.

He says: “The steerer tube is extensively drilled inside the headtube, the fork crown race is ‘golfballed’, the headtube is relieved either side and the lugs extensively ‘Bikini’d’ with hearts and windows. The brakes have to be built onto integral anchor bolts, brazed into the fork crown/rear bridge, to save weight, as far as i can tell no standard brake fits without being modified and i had to scratch make spring anchor washers and re-source thinner washers throughout! The fork crown has drillium all around and the steerer tube has been factory cut so that it wont accept a locking nut, i suppose the philosophy being that the bugger would come loose anyway, so get rid and save the weight, the BB shell has a massive heart cutout and lastly the short rear Campag’ ends are factory drilled”.

As you can see BD loves drilling stuff too and he’s done a grand job on this… DIY drillium – it’s the future!

Doom, you’re a boss.

Three videos from the sixties.

April 1, 2011

the footage is great but they’d be nothing without the MUSIC… I’m tapping my foot as I type!

The Milk Race. 1982.

March 10, 2011


I cannot stress enough how good this film is!

Twenty-five minutes of great, well shot british cycling footage. The soundtrack is awful but I suppose it makes a nice change from dubstep or eurotrance. The narration is pretty good too.

Enjoy.

Cyclepedia.

March 7, 2011

Thames and Hudson recently asked if I’d like to peruse a pre-publication copy of this book and, of course, without wavering I said yes.

A few days later a thud on the door mat indicated the arrival of said book. The following hours saw me sat in front of the fire, gawping at pages upon pages of pure -dare I say it- bike pron. It’s all good, with pro studio photographs of TT bikes, golden era racing cycles, randonneurs, mixtes, porteurs and also classic examples of radical bike design like the Elettromontaggi SRL Zoombike, the most beautiful folding bike I have ever seen!

As far as bike collections are concerned this one of Michael Embacher is the best, bar none and the fact that it is now in print, with accompanying words and a foreword by none other than Paul Smith means this book is not to be missed. Buy it, borrow it from a pal who has it, whatever. You’ll love it.

Cyclepedia, a tour of iconic bicycle designs is out mid march and you can also go to the free launch party at LMNH in London on 16th March.

Flying Scot.

January 11, 2011

Adding the final touches to a Flying Scot frame before painting. Behind the doors of the glittering front of their Murray Street shop, Rattray’s framebuilders worked their magic in these dark atmospheric surroundings.

Such an amazing photograph, for lovers of the Flying Scot.
Seen.

87. TdF Team time trial.

January 10, 2011

Stall Holder Pass.

December 3, 2010

We headed up to the ‘tradesman’ entrance where the flurry of smug faces with badges on chests that read ‘stall holder’ entered empty handed and exited with frames slung over shoulders. Each time I turn up to a cycle jumble – normally an hour or so before official opening and for reasons I still do not know – I can’t help but look on in absolute envy at these men who trade goods before the curtain goes up.

One morning, this morning, the early rise had paid off. As my partner and I stood, watching the line of items enter and exit the building like leaves carried by an army of ants, there was an opportune gap. The man who had been standing there, guarding the door had gone for his flask of tea. My girl, now standing beyond the golden threshold gestures at me to enter also, me, being a softy, I shake my head from side to side, she grabbed my hand and pulled me along behind her. I was in and it was 8.30am, not the 10am advertised on the flyer, and all thanks to the wife.

Did I manage to grab the vintage cycling bargain of the century? Nope, not really. I actually spent 50p. Right before we were escorted from the beige leisure centre and consequently shamed by the stern organiser, I managed to pick up one of my most treasured possessions today; A book, the 1979 published TI Raleigh story, 52 pages of printed wonder and all featuring the magnificently dominant TI Raleigh team of the 70s. My favourite. Now, having been read, and the pictures ogled it now sits proudly on my bookshelf.

I recently visited Tuscany for Le Coq Sportif’s L’Eroica and, while I was there to ride the race, I was mostly looking forward to the jumble. I wanted to see how the Italians do things and, well, it was mostly the same as here in the U.K but in another language, and outdoors, and hot, with more good stuff. I wandered around, a few paper Euros in my pocket, eyeing up Delta brakes, boxed gruppos and complete bikes dripping in Campagnolo but I found myself, after a few rounds, settling at one stall.

He had, as well as the obligatory sea of componentry, a large and fruitful selection of golden era magazines, badges, bunting, stickers, catalogues, mascots and postcards. Dandy. He wore an oil stained blue jumper, sleeves rolled up, with grey hair and chunky fingers and he chatted with his apple-eating friend. I leafed through a section of Pink Cyclisme cards. On the cover, Maertens, Thévenet, Poulidor, Hinault, to name but a few and all with penned signatures. I pick them up and enquired as to the price of said items. Then, after a lesson, shouted in Italian and pointed out with sausage fingers about the greatest cyclists of all time we agreed on €1 each. I bought ten.

I love a cycle jumble, me, I think they are great. All of that goodness under one roof, the hardware going for an asking price and not to the highest bidder, where you can handle the items and not just be reliant on jpegs on screens, the folks you meet have knowledge and enthusiasm dribbling off of their tongues and relish any opportunity to inform you of the origin of any item sat on their wooden wallpaper pasting table, you can slice their delight with a knife. It is also a social gathering where friends meet, you’ll most likely come across many unmanned stalls as Barry will be over there chatting with Pete. Unfortunately for me there won’t be one around these parts for a good few months as they only seem to spring up in the warmer months, but I suppose that leaves me with plenty of time to garner one of those ‘stall holder’ passes.

Flickr Grips. Old boys and TTs.

December 1, 2010

Spotted.

Pour un Maillot Jaune.

November 25, 2010

A cinematic tribute to the Tour by Oscar winning director Claude Lelouch.

This wonderful film of the 1965 Tour brings the hunt for the Yellow Jersey alive. Made three years after Louis Malle’s vintage “Vive Le Tour”, Lelouch’s film was made with the big screen in mind and is more cinematic in its scale than Malle’s. Without the restriction of narration, Lelouch lets the beautiful images of the Tour tell the story, which he sets against a brilliant and quite absorbing soundtrack.

There is no speech, no commentary and the quality could be better, however the three parts to this movie ‘For a Yellow jersey’ are an absolute must see.

Henri Cartier-Bresson.

November 18, 2010

Ever since university I have been a fan of Cartier-Bresson’s work. Only the other day I was speaking with my partner about my seldom used Moleskine notepad… The only words it contains from my time in higer learning, among illegible ramblings are “Look at works by Henri Cartier-Bresson”. Aah, bless.

Another one: France. 1932.

Via.

Utah.

November 16, 2010

Lovely images of the early Utah track scene.
Spotted at Tracko.


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