Posts Tagged ‘road’

L’Eroica 2011. Le Coq Sportif teaser.

September 25, 2011

Woop woop! My first cameo! Ok, so only a few days until L’Eroica 2011 and I’m raring to go… last year was an utter blast and I am once again privileged to be invited out to the event by my friends at Le Coq Sportif.

Peep my report from last year.
The atmosphere the whole weekend was electric, where 3000 like minded, fanatical individuals descend upon Gaiole in Chianti for two days of pure cycling nostalgia. Woolen jerseys and steel bikes aplenty, any man interested in the traditions of the cycle race can certainly find his fill here…

Not only that there’s lots of great food (I’m looking forward to the wild boar pasta myself), lashings of great Chianti wine, coupled with great surroundings… Damn! it’s like a little heaven in Italy for the weekend.

Only a few days now!

Somax.

August 28, 2011

Now this I like. Eveything about it has got it ‘going on’… Frame, wheels, group, Slamming.

More at Cycleexif.

Rapha Continental. Prologue.

August 4, 2011

Here we go again is the phrase that ran through my mind as we drove south through Oregon and into the state of Idaho. After riding some of the toughest stages of theTour of California earlier in the year, another stage race reconnaissance was in the offing. Darkness covered our way as we entered Wyoming and, lucky for us, it was still there when the sun came up. Here we go again. Bouncing along the straights of Highway 80 through Wyoming, a road that seems to run the 1,200 miles directly from Portland to the Denver International Airport, we finally took a quick right hand turn in Cheyenne (stopping at the illustrious diner The Egg and I) and entered the great state of Colorado….

Read more at Rapha Continental.

Raleigh train.

June 6, 2011

Found this image chilling on my desktop… what an awesome shot!

Mercier Hotness. 1980.

May 31, 2011

MERCIER FORMULE 1
France, 1980

Road bike with full aero styled Super Vitus 971 framework #M67666 finished in Mercier’s malve metallic. Shimano 600 EX group (6200), Belleri bar/stem, Ambrosio Montreal blue finished tubular rims, S.Marco Concor Supercorsa saddle and Wolber tubulars.

Beautiful bike. Great to see Shimano getting some love… And 600, too. A boss group.

Seen.

Rapha’s Hell of the North 2011. Done.

April 11, 2011

There they were, blasting along gravel roads, the odd bit of pavé and what were meant to be ‘mud tracks’ and not a grimace in sight, not even the hint of one. To be honest hell looked pretty good to me. Even a fellow who had encountered 4 punctures in his first 50km was as chipper as Gene Kelly underneath an umbrella. Hellish? Hmm, *looks left to right* not round here.

Hold tight for a full report and a stash of photographs over at Rapha later this the week.

Big thanks go out to Joe and Kieran.

Donhou Hotness.

March 18, 2011

I know Sparky wanted something special so he got an integrated seat post with custom expanding seat post stub to allow some adjustment should he change his seat or such things. Being a fair weather bike his bottom bracket got pretty heavily drilled and I carried this through to other areas such as the seat tube sleeve and modified Columbus Max crown. Yep couldn’t leave it alone, so I filled the window and drilled the tangs to make sure it tied in perfect with the frame.

The other main feature of this bike is the internal cable routing, with the rear brake cable exiting the rear of the seat tube, the rear derailleur cable exiting the bottom of the seat stay and the front derailleur cable coming straight out the back of the bottom bracket shell. Finished with a mix of Campagnolo parts this is one awesome road machine.

Yes it is, it’s a beaut. Donhou, it’s fair to say that you are currently ‘smashing it’. That’ll be street slang for ‘doing really well’. I think a trip to the workshop is on the cards. Congrats also to Sparkes, this is one lovely piece of kit you have, pal.

Donhou.

The Original Rapha boy.

October 21, 2010

René de Latour wrote:
Generally in a race of the Barrachi type, the changes are very rapid, with stints of no more than 300 yards. Altig was at the front when I started the check – and he was still there a minute later. Something must be wrong. Altig wasn’t even swinging aside to invite Anquetil through… Suddenly, on a flat road, Anquetil lost contact and a gap of three lengths appeared between the two partners. There followed one of the most sensational things I have ever seen in any form of cycle racing during my 35 years’ association with the sport – something which I consider as great a physical performance as a world hour record or a classic road race win. Altig was riding at 30mph at the front – and had been doing so for 15 minutes. When Anquetil lost contact, he had to ease the pace, wait for his partner to go by, push him powerfully in the back, sprint to the front again after losing 10 yards in the process, and again settle down to a 30mph stint at the front. Altig did not this just once but dozens of times.

Rudi Altig. The 70s German track and road monster.

Lars Bars.

October 13, 2010

I’d love to know how old this image is, as miseducated men have been doing this round my neck of the woods for years.

L’Eroica 2010. Spinwell for Le Coq Sportif.

October 5, 2010

What a weekend. Unbelievable, awesome, rad, mega, ace!

Having never been to L’Eroica and only having seen pictures on the internet I didn’t fully know what to expect but what came was among the best all-round cycling experience I have ever encountered. The atmosphere the whole weekend was electric, where 3000 like minded, fanatical individuals descend upon Gaiole in Chianti for two days of pure cycling nostalgia. Woolen jerseys and steel bikes aplenty, any man interested in the traditions of the cycle race can certainly find his fill here.

Day one on Saturday sees the flea market come into town, I say flea market it is a great big cycle jumble in English terms. Stretched out either side of Gaiole’s main road this jumble is big and not only is it big, it is good, very good. Everything you ever needed for your period build and all the accompaniments to go with it can be found here. Even the rarest of the rare is on the tables, it seems that the cream of Italy’s cycle merchandise dealers have landed in Chianti for the day to bless all of the hungry with their wares. You simply do not get a selection this good in the U.K.

If you are unhappy to ogle pantographed cranks and embroidered jerseys all day then you can visit the museum, where books, posters, videos and actual race bikes will greet you. Maybe taste and buy some local meat, fresh pasta, wine made in these hills, the food here is, well it’s just the absolute epitome of rustic goodness. This is, after all a cycling ‘holiday’ so it must be approached as such, take your time, see the sights, chat to the locals and the not so locals. Sometimes trying to speak to someone about your passion for cycles and cycling can be tiresome, remember though that every one here, each of the 3000 are more than happy to exchange verses on the virtue of the spoked wheel and tubed frame for they too are here for the exact reason you are.

The evenings see most people go off to their hotels or chalets to eat food and wine bought that day but we saw Le Coq’s Citroen HY van, looking fabulous in red, white and blue crank up the soundsystem for a grappa fuelled ipod party, but not after food with the stars. A sit down dinner with speeches from Italy’s cycling greats, it was like come dine with me with Fausto Coppi, yes, these were very old men.

Day two sees the cycle race along the fabled white gravel roads and Le Coq Sportif, my hosts, did a perfect job of organising cycles for everyone ( I rode a Campagnolo equipped 1977 Paletti ) and the registration procedure was just seamless. You need a number on your back, one on your bike and a stamp card and you are good to go, good to enter ‘race mode’ or ‘sportif mode’ for a day jam packed full of excitement and surprise. Depending on how your legs feel you can choose to ride either 38km, 75km, 135km or 205km but every one will be as pleasurable an experience as the next. Should you have any technical difficutlies someone will be along to help you out soon enough, such is the kinship on the road.

The roads ridden upon are made up of mainly white gravel paths called the Strade Bianche, fairly narrow in width and rutted like an ice ravaged mountain pass these roads are not to be taken softly. I have never ridden them but I can only imagine it to be like the cobbled straights of the paris-roubaix. Hang on tight, it’s going to get bumpy!

Along your way you will find a handful of food stops fully stocked up with local edible delights and alcohol too should you have the stomach.

Is it a race? Is is a ride? Who knows? But there are all levels out on the road, from the locals who hurtle past you and the vintage service car in front like a roller coaster coach direct and unrelenting to 90 year old men in full woolen suits being pushed up hills by boys half their age. This ‘race’ is legendary and I now know what the fuss is about. The moment tickets go on sale next year, I am buying one, or two.

Big thanks go to:
L’Eroica.
All the team at Le Coq Sportif. Check out their blog.
Matthew Sparkes of the Guardian
Andrew and Phillip Diprose the brothers of The Ride Journal.
The lovely gents from Hanon shop
And everyone else involved. Thank you!

Find many, many more L’Eroica images on the S P I N W E L L Flickr spot.

Cinelli x Mash.

September 27, 2010

Sure, it’s pretty nice and there is no doubt that kids everywhere want one of these 2011 Cinelli x Mash track framesets, but considering the amount of geared road and cross riding the Mash fellas’ do these days isn’t it about time that Cinelli introduced a Mash road frameset?

Mash! Cinelli! If you are reading this, get it done… The following will do, matte black, thanks.

Cinelli x Elley Kishimoto

September 16, 2010

Cinelli is very proud to announce it’s involvement in Eley Kishimoto’s FLASH ON project. The project began with the designers Mark Eley and Wakako Kishimoto interest in our classic Supercorsa Model..

This starting point grounded the project: the Cinelli Supercorsa is a very concrete piece of cycling’s cultural heritage, the longest running production model in the history of road cycling. It is a product by now more akin to a Carlo Barbera yarn than a bicycle simply for the elaborate cycle, and rarity of the techniques, used in its construction.
Knowing this, Eley Kishimoto, with typical playful antagonism, decided to paint “over” the original design, disguising the elaborate details (chromed lugs, pinstripe graphics, proprietary fastback stays)in their signature “Flash” pattern, producing a sort of visual double-take: you-see-it-you-don’t-see-it.

Wow, this looks awesome… a decent side on photograph would be nice though.

More info here.

H – A – R – D.

September 16, 2010



Stage one of the Rapha CCC Alps ridden by all. Some fast riders at front, setting a fierce pace. Interesting to see if they are still this competitive in eight days time. Some stragglers at the back, but they should be able to ‘get round’… Some have already gone into survival mode. Could be a long ride…

Read more about this epic adventure here.

New whip alert.

July 26, 2010

Got it this morning and after a few tweaks and minor adjustments I promptly stretched my limbs, donned my bib shorts and jersey and commenced to give it a damn good thrashing.

A good handful of miles later and all I can say is… Boy, it feels great to be back on a modern road bike. All hail compact gearing!

Olmo Progression.

July 9, 2010

From this: A beat up early nineties Olmo San Remo with a flaky paintjob, rust like tears weeping out of it’s surface and in desperate need of some help.

To this: The same beat up old early nineties Olmo San Remo but now with a fresh lick of “silver sparkle” powdercoat and a set of repro decals.

I was prevented from completing the build yesterday evening due to the loss or misplacement of my motherfu**ing bottom bracket lockring. No matter, sometimes stretching out these types of activities is the best way. I now look forward to getting hold of a modern italian BB as, to be quite honest the one it in is a knacker and probably needed to go anyway.

Bikezilla Birmingham Loop Race.

June 9, 2010

God, I’v got jitters with the excitement. Sunny Birmingham hasn’t had something like this in a good while, so it’s about time. Props to Fin for hooking this up and by the looks of it boy’s been busy collating the prizes too!

So, Birmingham people! Get yourself there and if everyone agrees not to mention the wea**r we should be in for one slamming evening.

More info.

Sunday morning Necessities.

June 7, 2010

Home made leather pouch.
Jimi Wallet.
Phone.
Mini Pump.
Tyre levers ( 4 year old Pedros’, the best I have ever used ).
Tube.
Mini tool kit.
Pu****re repair kit.

Big Rings.

May 13, 2010

Big Ring Riding. What an ace blog, dude’s got the cheek down pat! Plus there is plenty of swearing and I must say, I do love a bit of swearing.

Originally seen at GDB.
Follow Big Ring Riding on Twitter.

Moving Photographs.

April 8, 2010

Zullo now in the UK.

April 1, 2010

Tiziano Zullo was born in 1952 in the North of Italy. He started racing at the age of fourteen and in the early seventies came into contact with the world of frame building through some of the Italian builders. He began building frames, under his own name and for larger brands, and in 1978 he started to export the Zullo brand. By 1985 he was the frame supplier of the Dutch TVM team, a relationship that lasted until 1992. Zullo frames were ridden on the Milan San Remo, the Northern Classics and the Tours De France, Giro díItalia, La Vuelta and World Championships. He experimented with Aluminium and still has a custom Carbon frame but the range is still predominantly steel.

Zullo now at Mosquito bikes.
Via Road.cc
Zullo on the web.
Trackies may also like this from Zullo.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 74 other followers

%d bloggers like this: