Posts Tagged ‘print’

Essential Item No.5. Dynamo works print.

October 30, 2011

Here it is, my daily kick up the arse, thanks to Chris Sleath of Dynamo works.

When it’s raining or blowing a gale outside and I really don’t fancy it, this print beautifully made by hand and letter press that is hung proudly above my mantle let’s me know that if I want to keep this healthy heart of mine ticking, then I should just get on with it… And get on with I do.

For more amazing print work just like this go peep Dynamo.

SF 79.

October 25, 2011

For the manual two wheeled enthusiasts we’ve got our classic race inspired designs for Giro di Lombardia / Paris / Zurich / San Francisco. All four Giro di series are a 16″ x 20″ silkscreen print by Caleb Kozlowski.

Clean!

Super7 via Tracko.

L’Eroica 2011 and a Canonet 28.

October 9, 2011

First, let me explain:

I bought a camera, a Canonet 28 rangefinder 12 months ago from a market in Oswestry and instantly I fell in love with it’s small size and ease of use. That week I ran a film through it and the results were O.K but something was very wrong, I had horrible vertical lines and what looked like half frames over 90% of my negatives and consequently my prints too:

I only paid £3 for it but I was still quite unhappy as I knew what this little beast of a camera was capable of, unfortunately for me those capabilities did not translate through to my pictures.

I thought maybe it was the film, so I tried another. The same results. I thought perhaps it was the lab I was using, so I tried another and yet again, the same results.

At this point I’m gutted and beginning to type ‘canonet’ into Ebay every week to try and find a replacement. There were a few of them listed, but none of them £3. I’m about ready to quit.

I grab my DSLR again and begin using that, but in my opinion nothing can compare to the look and feel of film and also being able to fix a moment in time onto something physical is something that pleases me so once again I grab the Canonet and I proceed to open the back of it. I figure either the shutter is sticking or the rollers have filth in them so I use a small brush and some compressed air and I probe and hope that I can somehow accidentally fix the problem.

It’s 11 months now since I got my mitts on this camera and it’s still acting up but I had just messed with it so I cross my fingers and hope that this time my prints will be crystal clear and free from all unwanted lines and blemishes. I run a test film and low and behold, the results are exactly the same! I still have lines and I still have strange shadows and what look like half frames. A ghost in the camera maybe? I doubt it.

I’m now ready to take this heap of junk and toss it into a fire but I was desperate to take it with me to L’Eroica. The problem is it doesn’t work properly and time is running out for me to find a replacement.

I decide to finally take it to two camera stores with a selection of the dodgy prints to see if they can shed any light on my problem. I got nothing but the web address for a man who could “look at it” for me.

Three days now until L’Eroica and it’s not looking good so I have one last blast at fixing this piece of crap and then, after what seemed like hours of me staring into that back of the camera with a torch and a magnifying glass, like an apple falling onto the head it came to me *rolls drum* all along I’v been shooting rolls of film through this thing and it has no light seals, not anywhere, none!

A quick trip to my local haberdashery and I return with black felt and double sided tape for the DIY repair job. An hour later and I think I’ve solved my problem and just in the nick of time as in two days I fly to Italy for Le Coq Sportif’s L’Eroica. I have just enough time to shoot a roll and have it developed to see the results. These next prints will dictate whether this beauty of a rangefinder ends up either in the fire and burned to death or strapped proudly around my neck in Chianti.

It worked! I win! It’s now fixed and I can’t even begin to tell you how happy I am, it’s such an amazing little thing, it really is and all for £3 too. If you are ever after a compact, robust rangefinder and you can’t afford a Leica, go for one of these, seriously, they are that good.

And now some shots from my trip to L’Eroica last week with Le Coq Sportif. All of the following photographs were taken using my repaired Canonet 28;

See the rest of the Canonet group here.
Peep the Le Coq Sportif L’Eroica photopool here.
For more of my black and white photo work peep my Tumblr.

‘Very Well’ Ts. Gone.

June 20, 2011

Thanks to all that placed orders for the ‘Very Well’ T over the weekend. Once again I’m very happy to say that they sold out… apart from one XL, who wants it!?

A small selection is still available at Ideal skate supply in the UK and also Endless in Victoria, Australia.

All web orders have now been shipped and buyers should receive Wednesday at the latest.

Thanks again and hold tight for Spinwell Projects No.4… coming very soon!

Cyclepedia.

March 7, 2011

Thames and Hudson recently asked if I’d like to peruse a pre-publication copy of this book and, of course, without wavering I said yes.

A few days later a thud on the door mat indicated the arrival of said book. The following hours saw me sat in front of the fire, gawping at pages upon pages of pure -dare I say it- bike pron. It’s all good, with pro studio photographs of TT bikes, golden era racing cycles, randonneurs, mixtes, porteurs and also classic examples of radical bike design like the Elettromontaggi SRL Zoombike, the most beautiful folding bike I have ever seen!

As far as bike collections are concerned this one of Michael Embacher is the best, bar none and the fact that it is now in print, with accompanying words and a foreword by none other than Paul Smith means this book is not to be missed. Buy it, borrow it from a pal who has it, whatever. You’ll love it.

Cyclepedia, a tour of iconic bicycle designs is out mid march and you can also go to the free launch party at LMNH in London on 16th March.

Spinwell in Le Francais GQ.

December 19, 2010

Last Friday I had a pleasant surprise, by way of a January 2011 issue of Le Francais GQ magazine landing on my doormat at 9:15 in the morning. I flicked through it and straight to the L’Eroica piece. My pal Matthew Sparkes, tash and all on one page and a few of my words on the other. Buzzing!

Fancy a read? Head over to the Rock n Rollin’ Cycling team for hi-res scans!

Annecy.

December 19, 2010

Henri Cartier-Bresson.

November 18, 2010

Ever since university I have been a fan of Cartier-Bresson’s work. Only the other day I was speaking with my partner about my seldom used Moleskine notepad… The only words it contains from my time in higer learning, among illegible ramblings are “Look at works by Henri Cartier-Bresson”. Aah, bless.

Another one: France. 1932.

Via.

Hot-T.

September 28, 2010

This looks very good, slick! I believe I also have one in the post. Thanks Sam and big up.

Usage.

September 16, 2010

Nice work Sam!
Anyone who draws for the Red stripe is a friend of mine.

Do remember, you can all be in with a chance of winning the super lovely Spinwell Musette in limited edition Red canvas if you go here and enter the COMP!!!

Races in Paint.

July 27, 2010

Pat Cleary’s work is amazing, I always wished my pen/brush skills were better than they are.

More info on Pat Cleary’s work can be found here.
Originally spotted at GDB.

Kinfolk goodness.

July 21, 2010

Love this shot, bet that frame looks absolutely delish! Props out to Kyle, fantastic job done there sir.

Seen here and here.

Grand Boucle.

July 20, 2010

This magazine is meant to be a review and critical study of racing bicycles from 1903 until now (2009). The bikes shown are especially selected to accentuate the development in each decade.

Looks good, peep more here.

Spinwell Projects No.3 – The Musette.

July 19, 2010

Brilliant. Spinwell Projects No.3 – ‘The Musette’ is almost a complete batch.

Super happy at the outcome of these, they are exactly how I envisaged. The print looks fantastic, the quality of Hardysan’s stitch-work is amazing and above all it works, the tiny little refinements myself and Hardysan talked about and implemented on this, such a basic item turned out beautifully.

Out very soon! Keep em peeled for more details.

Dior Amore.

July 15, 2010

This image is awesome. Spotted over at Tracko.

Bicycle Portraits. South Africa.

June 8, 2010

The Bicycle Portraits project was initiated by Stan Engelbrecht (Cape Town, South Africa) and Nic Grobler (Johannesburg, South Africa) early in 2010. Whenever they can, together or separately, they’re on the lookout for fellow commuters, and people who use bicycles as part of their everyday work, to meet and photograph. They’re finding out who rides bicycles, why they ride bicycles, if and why they love their bicycles, and of course why so few South Africans choose bicycles as a transport option. There is no specific range of questions asked, they’d rather just establish a conversation around the rider’s life and where his or her bicycle fits into it. Please bear in mind that these recordings were transcribed verbatim and that english is not the first language of many of the characters they met. Being avid cyclists themselves, this project is as much an investigation into South African bicycle culture as it is an excuse for them to ride their bikes and take photographs. Follow the project on Twitter

The fellow in the photo at the top had this to say: “The bike, it’s been one year. I use it… not every day. It’s like gym, like exercise. Also some transport. This bike, you know Cash Converters? I buy it at that shop for R950.” Honest and to the point, a man I’d like to meet!

Great project. See more here.

October 1967.

June 3, 2010

Loving the minimal graphic design on this one.
Seen.

Print.

May 25, 2010

Seen.

Essential Reading.

April 28, 2010

The second volume in the series of Rapha Guides, the Great Road Climbs of the Southern Alps continues our journey along the roads and cols of Europe. Written by Graeme Fife with the photography of Pete Drinkell, the book captures the beauty and intrigue of the southern regions of the Alps, exploring climbs and roads steeped in the history of road racing and beyond.

Moving from the Col d’Izoard, close to the French-Italian border and over the mighty Cime de la Bonette, the book then encounters Mont Ventoux in Provence, a trip across the border to Italy and then through the central southern Alps to finish on the Riviera.

As well as full bleed, double-page images, the book features hand-illustrated maps and col profiles. Fife’s narrative, crafted with lashings of historical references, cultural observations and road racing snapshots is matched by the powerful photography of Drinkell.

Yes please, I’ll certainly go for one of these.
swoop here.

Rouleur 17.

April 6, 2010

It’s fair to say that Rouleur, since I discovered it is the only magazine that I can manage to read with the utmost of interest, cover to cover without being bored and I have no doubt that issue 17 ( out now ) will be the same.

Swoop yours here.
BTW. Have you seen how much issue No.1 is fetching these days? This one went for an astonishing £113!


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