Archive for April, 2010

Raliegh SB 951…

April 30, 2010

…On Ebay.

Buy it Now for only £875! If only.

Lust.

April 29, 2010

Looks like Max at TFG has been busy. Busy tapping away into Ebay because he recently managed to snag this absolute stunner of a TT bike off of there. Just look at that rear mech… You gotta love a bit of drillium! Gosh, jealous I am.

Like it? See more here.

Mo Paint.

April 29, 2010

keeping the cycle related artworks going, here are a couple spotted over at the No gallery webspot. Especially liking the vertically striped piece here, titled ‘peloton’.

Via Fixed gear Leeds.

Mo Cervelo.

April 29, 2010

I heart black bikes and especially black bikes that look like this.
More at Cervelo.

Beyond the Peloton.

April 29, 2010

After their successful first season, film makers Joseph Finkleman and Booker Sim follow the Cervélo TestTeam and capture the human passion and beauty of cycling. With their all-access passes, they show you what conventional race footage fails to capture: everything “beyond” the peloton.

Via the Cervelo Test team.

Paint.

April 29, 2010

Could the bottom picture be of 2009 National Champ, Kristian House supping at the elixir of life? The ever versatile Coca Cola. That stuff saved my life once, atop the cret de Chatillon. Doomed I was, doomed until handed the magical red tin by Joe, or was it Kieran? I don’t remember. I do remember however, having the ability to ride again, and speak again for that matter once the secret ingredients of the famous American cola had been fully consumed and digested. Unbeatable.

Imressive. Via.
Originally spottted at Tracko.

Kevin Keegan Corner Failure.

April 29, 2010

Essential Reading.

April 28, 2010

The second volume in the series of Rapha Guides, the Great Road Climbs of the Southern Alps continues our journey along the roads and cols of Europe. Written by Graeme Fife with the photography of Pete Drinkell, the book captures the beauty and intrigue of the southern regions of the Alps, exploring climbs and roads steeped in the history of road racing and beyond.

Moving from the Col d’Izoard, close to the French-Italian border and over the mighty Cime de la Bonette, the book then encounters Mont Ventoux in Provence, a trip across the border to Italy and then through the central southern Alps to finish on the Riviera.

As well as full bleed, double-page images, the book features hand-illustrated maps and col profiles. Fife’s narrative, crafted with lashings of historical references, cultural observations and road racing snapshots is matched by the powerful photography of Drinkell.

Yes please, I’ll certainly go for one of these.
swoop here.

Work.

April 27, 2010

Tucked away, deep into the busiest corner of my dining room is my ‘workshop’ where you will find me a lot of the time beavering away with grease and bearings and all of the other filthy stuff that goes with cycle maintenance.

Here is a photograph of said ‘workshop’ in all of it’s glory but there is one thing missing… A god damned workstand. If I have to lean over a top tube to extract cranks one more time I am going to lose my mind, I will probably also lose the straightness in my back while I am at it too!

Is your workshop weaker than mine? I’d like to see it. Send me your pics.

The Real Deal.

April 27, 2010

Gios Torino Aerodynamic

Torino, Italy early 80′s. Rare NOS Aerodynamic. Unique Gios with triangular profile rear stays. Shifters on top of down tube. Columbus Air tubing. In pristine shape and in original Gios box. Sold.

Damn. The one that got away.
Seen.

Specialized Scan 1993.

April 27, 2010

The best looking spoked carbon wheel of them all.

Clean Olmo…

April 27, 2010

… Spotted at Pristine Amsterdam.

Amsterdam in Black & White.

April 26, 2010

A little bit of an ‘off topic’ but here is a small selection of the photographs I shot whilst in Amsterdam, recently.

Alfred Letourneur in 2D.

April 26, 2010

The League of Cycling Purity.

April 26, 2010

Whilst hunting around for information on my latest bicycle acquisition I stumbled upon this quite amusing piece of writing:

Rules about bicycles

The frame must be of steel, lugged or fillet brazed.

Except for the first circle, wheels must be 27”, sprint rims, or (since 1997), 700c.

Components must be approved by the club. Generally this means they should be steel and of english manufacture. Now that there are very few bicycle parts made in the UK, members are faced with the choice of making their own from lumps of metal or using European components. Some Japanese parts are permitted, but very few and definitely no post 1985 Shimano.

All bearings must cup and cone ball bearings, with the balls loose and without cages.

Where deraillier gears are used, the control levers must be mounted on the down tube. After a fierce, and, at times, violent, internal debate in 1978 it was decided that it doesn’t really matter whether the cables are run over or under the bottom bracket.

Where hub gears are used, the control lever should be on the top tube. Handlebar or stem mounted levers are permitted but frowned upon and their use prevents the member from being elected to any of the great offices of the League. The control cable must be bare for the major part of its run, passing over a metal pulley mounted by a clip fixed near the top of the seat tube.

Pedals may be either rubber block or rat-trap type. Toeclips are permitted. They must be of steel, either chromium plated or stainless. Toe straps must be of leather, except for members undertaking jungle expeditions in the tropics, where since 1986 rot-proof nylon may be used. They may only be fitted after crossing the Tropic.

Clipless pedals are not permitted. The LCP is aware of the theoretical biomechanical efficiency gains that result from the centre of the pedal spindle passing through the ball of the foot. Some thought that the 1982 Shimano crank with this feature was a good idea, if flimsily executed. All agreed that is was a better idea than the one known previous experiment in this area, when in 1923 K.V. Brahhamlad-Vinkerton MA (Cantab.) made holes in his feet to accept the pedal spindles. Unfortunately, his garden shed was not as clean as might be desired for performing a major surgical procedure, and gangrene set in. He survived, but lost both feet. After his release from the Bethnal Asylum, he was fitted with artificial feet and continued his cycling, winning the League’s most improved rider trophy in 1933. Needless to say, his prosthetic feet had holes for the pedal spindles. K.V. Brahhamlad-Vinkerton was killed in action in 1944.

Read the rest of the rules of the LCP right here… and you really should too!

Breathtaking.

April 19, 2010

… Literally.

Col du Tourmalet, most certainly on this year’s ‘to do’ list.

Photos. Rapha x Battenkill.

April 19, 2010

Great shots, as always.
Via.

Drawings. Gilberto Colombo.

April 19, 2010

If you couldn’t tell from these drawings then you should know that Gilberto Colombo played a significant part in some of the most advancing bike frame designs in history.

Seen.

Raleigh Greatness.

April 19, 2010

Aaaah, the warm feeling I get when I spot the livery of a Professional Raleigh… Magnificent!

Col du Galibier. TdF 1993.

April 15, 2010

Great photos and there are a lot more where they came from… here.


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